Table of Contents:
  • Introduction /
  • Arthur Gewirtz,
  • James J. Kolb
  • Part I: Experimenters, rebels, and disparate voices
  • Searching for "the big American play": The theatre guild produces John Howard Lawson's Processional /
  • Beverle Bloch
  • The idiosyncratic theatre of John Howard Lawson /
  • John D. Shout
  • Glitzing the proletariat: John Howard Lawson's plays of the 1920s /
  • Michael C. O'Neill
  • Direction by design(er): Robert Edmond Jones and the new Provincetown players /
  • Jane T. Peterson
  • Glitter, glitz, and race: The production of Harlem /
  • Freda Scott Giles
  • Disparate voices: African American theatre critics of the 1920s /
  • Freda Scott Giles
  • Garland Anderson and appearances: The playwright and his play /
  • Alan Kreizenbeck
  • The first serious dramas on Broadway by African American playwrights /
  • Jeanne-Marie A. Miller
  • Theatre and community: The significance of Howard University's 1920s drama program /
  • Scott Zaluda
  • "To doubt is fatal": Eva Le Gallienne and the civic repertory theatre, 1926-1932 /
  • Estelle Aden
  • Sophie Treadwell's play Machinal: Strategies of reception and interpretation /
  • Kornelia Tancheva
  • Sophie Treadwell's summer with Boleslavsky and lectures for the American Laboratory Theatre /
  • Jerry Dickey
  • On "The Verge" of a new form: The cabinet of Dr. Caligari and Susan Glaspell's experiments in The Verge /
  • Steven Frank
  • They knew what they wanted: American theatre's use of nonverbal communication codes to marginalize non-native characters in the 1920s /
  • Beverly Bronson Smith
  • The Poet Lore plays: A new Chinese voice ... but how new? /
  • Dave Williams
  • Part II: Theatre and set design
  • Against the tide: Mordecai Gorelik and the New York Theatre of the 1920s
  • processional, Nirvana, the moon is a gong, and loudspeaker /
  • Anne Fletcher
  • "Another revolution to be heard from": Jane Heap and the International Theatre Exposition of 1926 /
  • John Bell
  • Architecture for the twentieth century: Imagining the theatre in the 1920s /
  • William F. Condee.