Metadata in the digital library : building an integrated strategy with xml / Richard Gartner.

This book provides a practical introduction to metadata for the digital library, describing in detail how to implement a strategic approach which will enable complex digital objects to be discovered, delivered and preserved in the short- and long-term.

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Online Access: Access E-Book
Access Note:Access to electronic resources restricted to Simmons University students, faculty and staff.
Main Author: Gartner, Richard (Author)
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: London : Facet Publishing, 2021.
Subjects:
Table of Contents:
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Figures and Tables
  • Acknowledgements
  • List of Abbreviations
  • 1 Introduction, Aims and Definitions
  • 1.1 Origins
  • 1.2 From information science to libraries
  • 1.3 The central place of metadata
  • 1.4 The book in outline
  • 2 Metadata Basics
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Three types of metadata
  • 2.2.1 Descriptive metadata
  • 2.2.2 Administrative metadata
  • 2.2.3 Structural metadata
  • 2.3 The core components of metadata
  • 2.3.1 Syntax
  • 2.3.2 Semantics
  • 2.3.3 Content rules
  • 2.4 Metadata standards
  • 2.5 Conclusion
  • 3 Planning a Metadata Strategy: Basic Principles
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Principle 1: Support all stages of the digital curation lifecycle
  • 3.3 Principle 2: Support the long-term preservation of the digital object
  • 3.4 Principle 3: Ensure interoperability
  • 3.5 Principle 4: Control metadata content wherever possible
  • 3.6 Principle 5: Ensure software independence
  • 3.7 Principle 6: Impose a logical system of identifiers
  • 3.8 Principle 7: Use standards whenever possible
  • 3.9 Principle 8: Ensure the integrity of the metadata itself
  • 3.10 Summary: the basic principles of a metadata strategy
  • 4 Planning a Metadata Strategy: Applying the Basic Principles
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Initial steps: standards as a foundation
  • 4.2.1 'Off-the shelf' standards
  • 4.2.2 Mapping out an architecture and serialising it into a standard
  • 4.2.3 Devising a local metadata scheme
  • 4.2.4 How standards support the basic principles
  • 4.3 Identifiers: everything in its place
  • 5 XML: The Syntactical Foundation of Metadata
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 What XML looks like
  • 5.3 XML schemas
  • 5.4 Namespaces
  • 5.5 Creating and editing XML
  • 5.6 Transforming XML
  • 5.7 Why use XML?
  • 6 METS: The Metadata Package
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Why use METS?
  • 6.3 The METS architecture
  • 6.4 Identifiers within METS
  • 6.5 The METS root element
  • 6.6 The METS Header
  • 6.7 Descriptive Metadata Section
  • 6.8 Administrative Metadata Section
  • 6.9 The File Section
  • 6.10 The Structural Map
  • 6.11 Structural Links and Behavior Section
  • 6.12 Creating and using METS in practice
  • 7 Descriptive Metadata: Semantics
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Dublin Core
  • 7.3 MODS
  • the Metadata Object Description Schema
  • 7.4 MARCXML
  • 7.5 Other descriptive metadata standards
  • 7.5.1 VRA Core
  • 7.5.2 Text Encoding Initiative P5 Manuscript Description
  • 7.5.3 Schemas from the sciences and social sciences
  • 7.5.4 Using these schemas
  • 7.6 Descriptive metadata: from semantics to content rules
  • 8 Descriptive Metadata: Content Rules
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Why content rules are needed
  • 8.3 Cataloguing rules
  • 8.3.1 Established standards for cataloguing rules
  • 8.4 Devising local guidelines
  • 8.5 Controlled vocabularies
  • 8.5.1 Name authorities
  • 8.5.2 Subjects
  • 8.5.3 Codes and dates