Reading against the grain(s) : American Indian history and horticulture in seventeenth-century New England / by Sharon Parrington.

This thesis seeks answer how historical sources, both linguistic and extralinguistic, pertaining to American Indian horticulture in seventeenth-century New England reflect different types of narratives, beliefs about the nature of time, and understandings of the relationship between the past and the...

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Bibliographic Details
Online Access: Access Thesis
Main Author: Parrington, Sharon (Author)
Corporate Author: Simmons College (Boston, Mass.)
Format: Thesis Book
Language:English
Published: Boston, Massachusetts : Simmons College, 2015.
Subjects:
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520 3 |a This thesis seeks answer how historical sources, both linguistic and extralinguistic, pertaining to American Indian horticulture in seventeenth-century New England reflect different types of narratives, beliefs about the nature of time, and understandings of the relationship between the past and the present. While written accounts penned by English colonists, American Indian oral traditions, and artifacts uncovered during archaeological excavations all contribute to the understanding of seventeenth-century New England American Indian horticulture, each 2speaks3 with a unique voice. To connect English and American Indian accounts of the past without glossing over the points at which these histories diverge or prioritizing one account over another, this essay argues that scholars must approach the past as a series of multiple, related yet distinct histories to study in tandem. 
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