The social transcript : uncovering library philosophy / Charles B. Osburn.

Many glimpses into what might be called library philosophy are scattered throughout the literatures of library history and library and information science, but none has coalesced as yet. Conversely, theories relative to the operation of libraries, rather than relative to why their operations are nec...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Osburn, Charles B.
Format: Book
Language:English
Published: Westport, Conn. : Libraries Unlimited, 2009.
Series:Beta Phi Mu monograph.
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Summary:Many glimpses into what might be called library philosophy are scattered throughout the literatures of library history and library and information science, but none has coalesced as yet. Conversely, theories relative to the operation of libraries, rather than relative to why their operations are necessary in the first place, are exceedingly abundant. At the heart of both resides function. On the one hand, the "concept of" a library reflects a rational social process, its genesis and survival the result of each succeeding generation embracing the same core values as the one before. At the same time, "practice in" the library is bounded by both the experiences and expectations of the public, and our choice and treatment of topic in our scholarly and professional literature. Not surprisingly, fundamental misunderstandings are shared among public, scholar, and librarian about what the library is and why it exists. Adapting the work of Kenneth Boulding, Charles Osburn presents a cogent, well substantiated explanation of why the library refuses to cede its position as a cultural icon; and how it not only continues but flourishes throughout the trials and errors of civilization. -- Back cover.
Physical Description:xv, 335 pages ; 24 cm.
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 303-324) and index.
ISBN:9781591587583
1591587581
ISSN:1041-2751